Guide to Posting Tweets and Facebook Posts at the Best Time

I recently twitted an interesting article about posting Tweets, Facebook Post and Emails at he best time. Then I read even more about that topic and decided to write my thoughts about statics and my experience.

1. What is the best time to post your updates on Facebook?

There is no such thing like best time of day to pst on Facebook, but stats ranging from 1pm to get the most shares, to 3pm to get more clicks, to the broader suggestion of anytime between 9am and 7pm. So, its seems like the early afternoon is a solid time to post, and anytime after dinner and before work being.

On the other site the infographic from KISSmetrics and Dan Zarrella found that engagement is 32% higher on weekends. So the end of the week is definitely a good time for posting updates:

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Another study of Buddy Media found that engagement rates are 18% higher on Thursdays and Fridays and the explanation about it is: “the less people want to be at work, the more they are on Facebook!”:

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2. When is the best time to tweet?

According to Dan Zarella’s research twitter engagement for brands is 17% higher on weekends.

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Another study (Argyle Social) showed that weekdays provide 14% more engagement than weekends:

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When we look at the time of day, retweets have been shown to be highest around 5pm:

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The best times for click-throughs seem to be around noon and 6pm:

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But most important is to have online performance on twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest… it’s always good to analyze the best time to post, so the brand could reach more audience, but for international brands, that are all over the world, there is always a good time to post!

 

What will blow our minds in the *next* 30 years?

Interesting article about the future

TED Blog

Predictions are a mug’s game. If they come true, you likely didn’t push your thinking hard enough. If they don’t come true, you risk looking like an idiot. Nonetheless, many speakers at the annual TED conference have taken the plunge and proffered thoughts of what the future might look like. The video above takes a quick spin through just some of them, with thoughts from tech pioneers including Nicholas Negroponte, Rodney Brooks, Jeff Han and Pattie Maes.

Below, we asked many of the attendees and speakers at this year’s just-wrapped TED to riff off the conference’s theme (“The Next Chapter”) and tell us what they think might radically change society, life, technology and so on in the *next* 30 years. From funny and wry to deeply insightful, the answers will surprise you.

“One of the things about learning how to read — we have been doing a lot of consuming of…

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The five rules of PR video production

1. Define your audience.
Marketing is about positioning and communicating your unique value to a very specific audience. Your product or service won’t appeal to everyone. In fact it probably won’t appeal to that many people at all. You have to ensure that you craft a message that is tailored to the specific concerns of a very well defined audience.
2. Tell a great emotional story.
Most corporate video productions today are recitations of facts, features and benefits. Most viewers never get to the end of these videos, because there are boring! If you want your viewer to watch and remember your message then you have to connect with them on an emotional level.
3. Show me, don’t tell me. 
Video is by far the fastest growing marketing tactic in use today because it informs and persuades better than any other media type. Why just explain how your product works when you can actually show people using and benefiting from that product? Video is gaining popularity because it is the best means of conveying a great deal of information quickly to an attention-deficit plagued audience.  Video is particularly effective when you need to showcase the more intangible benefits of a product.
4. Problem-solution.
Your customer wants to know how your product can solve their problems – that’s what matters to them. They really don’t care much about your history or your processes. And yet the vast majority of corporate videos today are still not written from the client’s perspective. Most businesses continue to create videos that talk about themselves. You should be thinking like your customers.
What do they care about? What are their problems?
5. Share what you really believe.
Getting people’s attention is just the first step. Somewhere along the buying cycle you’re likely going to have to give up a bit more of yourself than you’d like. What do you believe? What are your core values? This never really used to matter. Today it does.